Tea - Audience Types, Ages, and Preferences

Goals

To understand 2-3 different audience types who drink tea. For these audience types, and ideal response would include who they are, their typical age groups, and general data about them. This will be to support a new tea brand that has clean ingredients to promote brain health and will be an alternative to sugary drinks.

Early Findings

We were not provided a geographic focus, so we assumed a United States view. If a more broad approach is desired, for example, a global focus, this would have to be clearly communicated to us in any reply. We were also not told whether this should surround hot tea drinkers, cold tea drinkers, or both. We assumed both. If that is incorrect, that should also be clearly communicated to us in any reply. Finally, we were not told what kind of tea (black, green, different varietals) so we assumed all kinds of tea. If that is incorrect, that should also be clearly communicated to us in any reply.
  • 87% of Millennials say that they regularly drink tea. On any given day, over fifty percent of the American population drinks tea. On a regional basis, the South and Northeast have the greatest concentration of tea drinkers.
  • Over 158 million Americans will drink tea on any given day. Since it is the only beverage that is served hot or cold on a regular basis, the beverage appeals to many different kinds of people, which speaks to why Americans drank over 3.8 billion gallons of it in 2018.
  • As research published by BevNET.com revealed, both Millennials and Generation Z favor higher-quality tea products, often containing botanicals, and are frequent purchasers of ready-to-drink tea products. The same research also showed that these two groups “want clean-label and sustainably and ethically sourced tea,” and are likely to seek out “global tea styles,” such as Kenyan purple teas.
  • Gen Z consumers reported a definitive preference for green tea, at 38 percent, compared to black tea at 19 percent. When asked in the same survey what flavors/infusions they preferred in tea, Gen Z opted for “herbal” and “sweet” equally at 67 percent, while Millennials preferred “fruity” and “herbal” at 72 percent and 64 percent respectively.
  • Millennials and Gen Z are also driving the demand in boba, milk teas and other non-classic categories.
  • According to this demographic summary of tea drinkers, "what was once a predominately female, older consumer, has evolved into a much broader target audience depending upon the specific segment and drinking occasion."
  • In this older demographic study from 2012, specialty tea consumption is much higher in the West. Consumers in the Mountain region are the most likely to purchase specialty teas (+64%), followed by those in the Pacific region (+49%). New England is also a good census division for the sales of specialty teas.
  • According to this 2019 study, "females were more likely to be tea consumers than were males; the effect of gender was significant (p < 0.0001). Second, the percentage of tea consumers more than doubled with age (p < 0.0001). One in four adults aged >50 years in the NHANES sample consumed tea but fewer than 1 in 10 children or adolescents. Third, tea drinking varied among racial/ethnic groups. Least likely to drink tea were Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Blacks. Most likely to drink tea were non-Hispanic Asians and non-Hispanic Whites."
  • Again from this same very recent study, "the percent of tea consumers approximately doubled with rising education and incomes. The effects of income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) and educational attainment were both significant (p < 0.0001). Analyses of amounts of tea consumed produced a similar socio-demographic profile of tea consumers. There were significant effects of age, race/ethnicity, education and incomes. Most tea was consumed by adults >50 years, non-Hispanic Asians and Whites, and by groups with IPR > 3.5.and college education."

Summary Of Our Early Findings Relevant To The Goals

  • As discussed at the top of this document, we were not provided a geographic focus, so we assumed a United States view. We were also not told whether this should surround hot tea drinkers, cold tea drinkers, or both. We assumed both. Finally, we were not told what kind of tea (black, green, different varietals) so we assumed all kinds of tea. If any of this is incorrect, that should be clearly communicated to us in any reply.
  • We found a very recent credible and reliable study surrounding the demographics of tea drinkers in the United States. That data is contained in the last two bullet points.
  • Please select one or more of the options provided in the proposed scoping section below.

Proposed next steps:

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