Maven Clinic Research

Goals

To gain an understanding of women's healthcare in the U.S., including how it has changed over the years, whether women have care equal to men, major moments in women's healthcare, major issues, and the impact of race/geography/age on the major issues.

Early Findings

  • The Commonwealth fund looked at the state of women's healthcare in the U.S. as compared to 10 other countries with high average incomes. This study found that women in the U.S. have the less positive healthcare experiences than women in the other 10 countries.
  • They also found that women in the U.S. were more likely to suffer with chronic illness, forego needed health care due to costs, and have difficulty paying for healthcare services they have received than women in the other 10 countries.
  • The U.S. was found to have the highest rate of maternal mortality, but among the lowest rates of death related to breast cancer.
  • More than 33% of women in the U.S. reported that they have skipped a needed medical service due to the cost.
  • The CDC's Pregnancy-Related Mortality Surveillance System (PMSS) tracks pregnancy-related deaths in the U.S., which rose from 15 deaths per 1,000 births in 2007 to 17 deaths per 1,000 births in 2016.
  • Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native women have the highest rates of pregnancy related deaths at 40.8 per 1,000 and 29.7 per 1,000, respectively.
  • According to a report from Harvard University, women in the U.S. are more likely to have a regular source of healthcare and health insurance than men. They are also three times more likely to have seen a doctor in the past year than their male counterparts, indicating healthcare may be better for women than men in the U.S.
  • According to the CDC, 8.4% of women and 10.5% of men in the U.S. are uninsured, again indicating that healthcare may be better for women than men in the U.S.

Proposed next steps:

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