Ecommerce Onboarding Quizzes

Goals

To have a broad understanding surrounding where users tend to drop off during an onboarding quiz for an online styling, design service, or any other ecommerce site. Some things to consider would be the number of questions that might be optimal for a personal styling quiz, which types of questions might make a user drop off or abandon the process, and at which point is the best time in a style quiz to collect the user's name and email. An ideal response would include statistics or any quantifiable data points, and any case studies on style quizzes from companies such as Stitch Fix, Havenly, Trunk Club, Rocksbox, and Birchbox.

Early Findings

  • Ecommerce sites should ask for push notification opt-Ins as they have a high success rate. Specifically, on average, push notifications have an eighty-four percent opt-in rate across Android, and a forty-seven percent opt-in rate across iOS.
  • Consumers tend not to enjoy signing up because it tends to be a long, drawn-out process. This is the stage where most apps see a significant amount of drop-off in usage, losing up to fifty-six percent of shoppers. However, this stage is necessary and if done well, can make a huge difference in improving the activation and retention rates.
  • Ecommerce brands should send welcome emails to help shoppers onboard. Welcome emails see open rates that are almost 3x the average email campaign, about forty-six percent, in fact.
  • "User onboarding does not begin and end with the first experience. There are three stages of user onboarding: Before: The sign-up/registration phase. How friendly is your form? During: The initial user onboarding flow that most people consider “user onboarding.” After: All other stages of the customer lifecycle. How can you help existing users understand new features?"
  • According to Outgrow, ecommerce companies should be "careful because filling out a form can be annoying, especially if it is long and asking for irrelevant information. Only ask for information that is necessary and helps in customer profiling."
  • According to BuzzSumo, data shows that on average an ecommerce quiz gets shared 1,900 times. Some top-performing quizzes that BuzzSumo tracked were shared nearly 4 million times.

Case Study: True and Co.

  • A quiz is used to sell bras on True & Co. On their home page there is an option to take a fit quiz. The first question asks: "How are your shoulder straps", with three bullet points to choose from. Then, users are asked to choose the shape that they think best matches their breasts. There are drawings included so that users have a clear understanding of what each shape really means. They are then are asked what is the brand and size of their best fitting (and beloved) bra. Users are then asked about their cup size, how they feel about padding, colors they like to wear, their band fit, hook preferences, how old their bra is that they would like to replace, if one breast is larger than the other, and a few more questions one of which is their dress size. If a user skips a question, a popup appears to let them know they need to finish it in order to move forward. Towards the end, users are asked to share their birthday so that True & Co can reward customers on their special day. Then, to get three personalized bra recommendations users need to fill in their email address and a password to create an account.

Summary Of Our Early Findings Relevant To The Goals

  • Our initial hour of research surrounded two things: to see which parts of the ask were publicly available, and to provide some preliminary data, including one case study for an online styling guide quiz to purchase a bra.
  • We found no evidence of any data surrounding where users tend to drop off during an onboarding quiz specifically for an online styling or design service. We also did not see that generally for any kind of ecommerce website.
  • Specifically, we are referring to the fact that during this first hour, we did not find anything that would answer the questions surrounding the number of questions that is optimal for a personal styling quiz, which types of questions might make a user drop off or abandon the process, and at which point is the best time in a style quiz to collect the user's name and email. This is not to say that it is not out there, we just could not find it in the hour allotted for this. We are suggesting however, that this will not likely be found for a specific quiz on personal styling, but could be found in a general manner. We will suggest research surrounding that.
  • We were not given a geographic focus, so we assumed a global view. If a more targeted approach is desired, for example, the United States, this would have to be clearly communicated to us in any reply.
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