Patients with Chronic Disease

Goals

To find out the number of people in the United States who had, or currently live with Diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Early Findings

Diabetes
  • Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States.
  • 9% of the US population has diabetes.
  • According to data provided by the CDC, at least 79,535 American deaths occur yearly because of diabetes.
  • 1 in 4 Americans has diabetes and doesn't know it.
  • The number of Americans living with diagnosed diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, peaked at 8.2 per every 100 adults in 2009. In 2017, the number of Americans living with diagnosed diabetes was 8 per every 100 adults.
Type 1 Diabetes
  • 1.25 million Americans currently have Type 1 diabetes.
  • An additional 40,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes this year.
  • An estimated 5 million Americans are expected to be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes by 2050.
  • Of the Americans who currently have Type 1 diabetes, 200,000 are younger than 20 years old.
  • That number is expected to increase to 600,000 by 2050.
  • Of Americans under the age of 20 who were diagnosed with Type 1diabetes, non-Hispanic whites have the highest diagnosis rate.
Type 2 Diabetes
  • Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes.
  • According to the CDC, 90% to 95% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.
  • Approximately 80% of Americans who have Type 2 diabetes are overweight and have a family history of Type 2 diabetes.
  • The average age onset for Type 2 diabetes is 45. The likelihood that an American will develop and be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes increases drastically after age 45.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Smoking tobacco is a major risk factor contributing to the development of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).
  • Approximately 25% of American COPD sufferers have never smoked tobacco products. In those cases, workplace exposure to COPD causing agents is thought to be what caused or contributed to the development of COPD.
  • The age-adjusted prevalence of COPD in the United States varies by state and geographic region.
  • According to the CDC, the overall age-adjusted prevalence of COPD was "higher among women, older adults, American Indians, and Alaska Natives. COPD prevalence was also higher among individuals who were obese or underweight, reported no leisure-time physical activity in the past 30 days, had a history of asthma, were less educated, resided in rural areas, and had other chronic conditions."
  • More than 16 million American adults have been diagnosed with COPD.
  • COPD is the 4th most common cause of death in the United States.
  • Americans living in rural areas are almost twice as likely to develop COPD compared to Americans living in metropolitan or urban areas.
  • Women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with COPD, 56% to 44% respectively.

Proposed next steps:

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We are suggesting research that provides the number of patients in the United States who had, or currently live with Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Please check this box if we should proceed with this research.
Additionally, we are suggesting research that provides information on the causes, costs associated with (these costs could include loss of work, cost of medications, and loss of quality of life) , and treatment options for Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).